Flunking the Seminal Interview and IRFD

If anything can go wrong, it will go wrong. Horribly wrong. Today the wrath of Murphy’s Law lashed out in full effect as I went for my interview. All was well until I stepped out of the house. I left one hour at 2pm before the scheduled time slot, thinking I had more than sufficient time to make my way down to SGH. Then the bad karma started rolling. First on the way to the MRT I was stopped by an overly enthusiastic flyer distributor promoting WWF Singapore. Not that I blamed him; but it was just luck that I had to run into him at that moment (to help promote his cause you may want to “lik”e WWF SG on Facebook). Then the MRT took ages to arrive, as with the SGH shuttle bus service. By the time I had reached the main grounds of SGH, it was already slightly past 3pm. Flustered, I hurriedly asked the information staff for directions to the HR office. Her reply nearly gave me a heart attack. “I’m sorry ma’am. The HR office is not at SGH; it’s at Bukit Merah.” Whaaaat?! It turned out that I had been too complacent and did not check the location map attached in the email, assuming that the HR office was at SGH where in fact it was located elsewhere. Immediately I took a taxi down to the correct place.

To complicate things even further, it turned out that the HR was only responsible for verifying my personal particulars whereas the actual interview was at SGH. So I was ushered off once again to SGH. Although there was a shuttle service, it again took ages to arrive and I resorted to taking a taxi back to SGH. $$Money$$ flying out of the window :(. I arrived just in the nick of time at 4pm. Phew. I thought the slew of bad events was over, but it was not to be.

The first question the usual tell-me-more-about-yourself, which is expected but nevertheless the question which I most abhor and dread. I mean, how are you suppose to relate your life history to a complete stranger in five minutes? I stuttered and stammered; words couldn’t seem to come out of my mouth, which may have been in part due to the way she scrutinized my arms. It got me self-conscious and I couldn’t think straight. I don’t want to get too much into the details, but the overall feeling was that the interview totally bombed. There goes my one and only job offer.

On a lighter and much happier note, I plucked up the courage went for my first Raw food event, befittingly to celebrate International Raw Food Day (IRFD), held on July 11 annually. It was really kudos to Sheryl from EatGreenCake, also fellow IG friend, that I got to know about this event. Since I had nothing on yesterday, I decided to overcome my apprehension and pop by. After all, it wouldn’t hurt.

IRFD-Logo

I’m so glad I went for IRFD. It was eye-opening to meet a small but strong community of like-minded raw foodists so passionate about health and wellness. There was a screening of the documentary film Fat, Dead and Nearly Sick, which chronicles the 60-day juice-fast of Joe Cross as he battles his obesity. Far from being “top-down,” as some diet shows can be, it was humorous and inspiring. While obesity may be the more common issue for most people, mine lies on the other end of the spectrum, ie. weight gain. Seeing Joe’s and Phil’s determination and perseverance to shed those pounds has inspired me to kick-start (yet again) a weight-gain program. Served alongside were some of the most delectable raw nibbles created by the famous Arianne Uebel of The Rawyal Kitchen, Sharon from Rawlicious and Jeff of The Asian Raw Chef. These included a spicy curry salad (just my luck to bite into a chili padi!), spirulina energy bliss balls, dehydrated flax crackers with garlicky guacamole and a super yummy cheezy lettuce leaf tacos. And to end on a sugar high, an oh-so-fudgy-you-won’t-believe-it’s-raw-and-vegan brownies by Sheryl. They were so good it would put Larabars and Nakd bars to shame. As evidence to show how inspired I am, I actually went down to the library to borrow The China Study by T. Campbell, as recommended by Esther.

To end off, here’s some Butter Mao Shan Wang durian from Combat at Balestier. At $20 per kg, it was pricier than the average stall but the quality of their durians are supposedly superior. So I bit the bullet and probably this was the only good thing that happened today. Small seed, copious flesh, unctuously rich with a lingering bitterness – divine. I was kind of cheated though; I thought Butter durian was a different variety from Mao Shan but it turned out that they just named their Mao Shan durian “Butter.” Marketing gimmick!

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